Rubbish on the beach

Discussion on accommodation, restaurants, and attractions in neighbouring Ban Krut.
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bochog
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Joined: 29 Oct 2012 11:49

Rubbish on the beach

Post by bochog » 29 Oct 2012 12:08

"Welcome to Ban Krud!
Can you imagine an unspoilt stretch of beach where you can walk with white powdery sand underfoot and barely see another soul. If you can you have just discovered Ban Krut"

This quote is what i remember of Ban Krud from my visits to the Bangsaphan area in 2008,2009&2010. Told many people in UK and Australia what a beautiful quiet part of Thailand it was.

Going down there this week however, the entire length of the beach looks like a rubbish tip.
(except for where the big resorts have raked the sand, but the water is still full of bags/rubbish etc)

Ended up going down to Chumphon sand dunes for a swim where the water was clean and rubbish on beach was minimal.

Where is the Ban Krud rubbish coming from..parties on beach and no-one takes it home? Fishing boats dumping rubbish overboard (saw a few fluro light bulbs in the mix)?
Is the current level of rubbish a permanent feature now?

thanks for reading

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Big Boy
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Re: rubbish

Post by Big Boy » 29 Oct 2012 12:56

Could it be part of the ANNUAL lom wao, or "kite wind" phenomenon, which has been affecting the likes of Hua Hin so badly in the last week or so?
Green Army

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Caller
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Re: rubbish

Post by Caller » 29 Oct 2012 18:40

I think it can get washed up after a storm as well. Woke up to this in BS a couple of years back - pretty much all the stuff you describe - it was in January:
IMG_1544.JPG

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buksida
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Re: rubbish

Post by buksida » 29 Oct 2012 18:53

Yes, this happens every year or two with the northeasterly winds and storm combination. 80% of the trash has been thrown into the ocean by fishing boats, the other 20% has come from local rivers and estuarys where locals have dumped it.

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